Monday, June 20, 2011

Raw Chocolate Pudding



Preparation time: 20 mins

Cooking time: 5 mins

Makes 6 servings



1/2  cup Raw Cashews Soaked Overnight

2 – Large Avocados

3 Tbsp. Tbs Raw Unrefined Coconut Oil

3/4 cup Raw Cacao Powder

1/4 cup Raw Honey

1 can coconut milk

1 Tbsp. Ground Chia Seed

1/4 packet Stevia Powder

2 tsp. Vanilla

1/2 tsp. Raw Sea Salt



Add all to Vita-Mix mixer and blend until smooth. Make sure you use sea salt, or real salt and not refined table salt. Use cut Strawberries for garnish.



Nutrition Facts

Raw Chocolate Pudding

Serving Size 1/2 cup

Amount Per Serving



Calories 301.3 Calories from Fat 190

% Daily Value Total Fat 21.05g 32% Saturated Fat 8.61g 43% Trans Fat 0g Cholesterol 0mg 0% Sodium 14.43mg 1% Total Carbohydrate 24.92g 8% Dietary Fiber 5.46g 22% Sugars 12.4g Protein 5.77g 12% Vitamin A (IU) 48.91 1% Vitamin C 3.35mg 6% Calcium 36.15mg 4% Iron 2.25mg 12%

Saturday, June 11, 2011

Whole Milk Kefir

Kefir (pronounced /kəˈfɪər/ kə-feer)[1] (alternately kefīrs, keefir, kephir, kewra, talai, mudu kekiya, milkkefir, búlgaros), purportedly[citation needed] from either the Arabic "keyf" (joy/pleasure) or the Turkic "köpür" ((milk) froth, foam), is a fermented milk drink that originated with shepherds of the North Caucasus region, who discovered that fresh milk carried in leather pouches would occasionally ferment into an effervescent beverage. It is prepared by inoculating cow, goat, or sheep's milk with kefir grains. Traditional kefir was made in skin bags that were hung near a doorway; the bag would be knocked by anyone passing through the doorway to help keep the milk and kefir grains well mixed.[2] Dairy-free alternatives, such as coconut milk kefir and soy milk kefir, are available.

Marco Polo mentions kefir in recounting his travels.[3]

Kefir is an amazing health drink with many benefits!


In a quart jar add about 1/4 cup of Kefir grains and a start from a previously cultured batch. Pour whole milk over the top until it fills the jar a little over 3/4 of the way full.

Let it sit in a dark place overnight, depending upon the strength of the Kefir that you wish to obtain allow to sit 12-18 hours. (If it is allowed to sit further it will be considered "Over-Ripened" which is not particularly harmful but it will be very sour).

You can then use it to make smoothies, as a replacement for buttermilk and yogurt, plus it contains yeasts from which you can make sourdough bread.

Here's a quick recipe:

Ingredients: Makes 1 serving (1 each)

1 cup Whole Milk Kefir [recipe]
1 cup Whole Strawberries
1/2 tsp. Stevia

Directions:
Add Kefir, Strawberries and Stevia to a Vita-Mix mixer. Blend until smooth.

Enjoy!

Nutrition Facts
Strawberry Kefir
Serving Size 1 each

Amount Per Serving

Calories 201.81 Calories from Fat 80

% Daily Value
Total Fat 8.87g 14%
Saturated Fat 4.57g 23%
Trans Fat 0.24g
Cholesterol 24.4mg 8%
Sodium 105.74mg 4%
Total Carbohydrate 22.79g 8%
Dietary Fiber 2.88g 12%
Sugars 18.77g
Protein 9.3g 19%
Vitamin A (IU) 266.16 5%
Vitamin C 84.67mg 141%
Calcium 298.76mg 30%
Iron 0.68mg 4%

Monday, May 23, 2011

Kombucha (More helpful information)

Kombucha - Ancient Chinese and Russian Home Remedy as Fermented Tea

Kombucha Rejuvenates, Restores, Revitalizes, Recharges, Rebuilds, Regenerates, Replenishes, Rebalances and Renuews!

Correctly brewed Kombucha contains healthful enzymes, probiotics for gut integrity plus all the benefits of green tea.

Kombucha supports...
Digestion
Metabolism
Immune system function
Appetite and weight control
Liver function
Body alkalinity
Anti-Aging
Cell integrity
Healthy Skin and Hair

Getting Started: Gather the following...
A one gallon or 3 liter glass container, (not plastic or metal) with wide mouth
Water; enopugh for your container to within a couple inches of top, pure and chlorine free (boil tap water for 5 minutes without lid or let set 24 hours uncovered) Use high alkaline water if available.

Kombucha colony (starter) from previous batch or a friend (about 1/3 cup of previously made kombucha tea). This is the fermented tea with microbes in it. About 1/3 cup.

Sugar; organic sugar, or regular white. Don't worry about ingesting sugar, if your colony is well and healthy, they consume the sugar and produce healthful enzymes and acides within a week to 10 days or longer. Finished Kombucha should not taste sweet. Don't use honey as it will kill microbes. For one gallon use 1 cup. Cut back for smaller batches.

Tea; Green tea, decaffinated green tea, regular black tea, or yerba mate tea in bags. If you experiment with other herbal teas, keep the ratio with green tea 3:1 for best, most healthful results. For 1 gallon of tea use 5-6 bags.

Vinegar: this should be only fermented apple cider vinegar like Bragg's. For one gallon use only 1 tsp. or less per batch. This helps keep the tea on the alkaline side of ph scale. Kombucha is a high Alkaline tonic. Although apple cider vinegar tastes acidic, it is really alkaline. If you can get 8ph water - no need for vinegar.

Paper for cap; coffee filter papers work fery well for keep ing the top of jar covered but open to air. Paper towel would work also. Write the date of your Kombucha on the paper cap and the ingredients. Use an elastic to hold it in place during fermentation.

Warm place: Kombucha ferments swiftly in a warm place. In winter I use a heating pad set on low and pack a towel around it. This place should not be around moldy bread or places where pet dander or other dust accumulates. Limited direct sunlight it OK.

Batching; Heat water, maybe half of what the total is, until almost boiling. Turn off heat and add the tea bags. Let steep for an hour or more and cool down. Take the tea bags out and squeeze dry if you like, then add the sugar and vinegar. Stir to dissolve and pour into clean glass jar. Add more pure water. Before adding starter and "mushroom", test temperature. You should be able to leave a little finger in the solution and not be uncomfortable. Add the starter and "mushroom" then cap the jar with the paper and elastic. Set in warm place and leave it alone.

Fermenting: You can check on the tea as it ferments. You will see bubbles rising and the "mushroom" will be growing. You may see some floaty stuff in it which is normal. You may also see some brown stuff hanging on the underside of the "mushroom" and this is also normal. It is kind of a rudimentary root system. The top of the "mushroom" should look shiny and kind of white and opaque. There may be some liquid on the top this is also normal. If the "mushroom" falls to the bottom that is OK, it will eventually come back up. The microbes (combination of bacteria, fungus and lichen... all friendly) make this cap to protect themselves from harmful microbes. If temperatures slip lower than 75 degrees the microbes will still keep reproducing by they slow down. They will keep working even in the fridge after decanting.

Decanting: This is the pour off. Test your Kombucha after a week with a straw or spoon. If it tastes very "dry" and a bit vinegary with some fizz to it, then it is ready. If it still tastes sweet then it could use another couple days of fermenting. This fermenting process does produce some alcohol but it is very minimum... like less than .5% and if you compare that to wine which is approx. 11-12% and beer or ale at 5-6% then .5% is hardly noticable.

Use a clean fork to take out the "mushroom" and place in a clean bowl. Use a fine strainer as you pour off the Kombucha into another clean container. Kombucha can be stored in smaller glass jars with tight fitting lids. They keep refrigerated for many weeks and months. Some microbes may accumulate in the bottom but this is normal as the microbes keep living and reproducing even in the cold.

Keep about 1/3-1/2 cup Kombucha in the bottom of the fermenting jar to start the next batch. WIth clean fingers, separate the two layers of "mushroom" and use the top one or parts of it for the next batch. The new one is sometimes called the "baby" and the bottom one is the original one and sometimes called the "mother." This "mushroom" cap can be eaten. I chop it up and add some salt, dill onion and a.c. vinegar and make a sort of pickle out of them. They can be thrown away or ground up and used in compost. Old "mushrooms" can also be kept in a Ziplock bag or plastic container in tnhe fridge for months.

Consuming: Drink about 4-8 ounces a day diluted with pure water or with fruit juice.

Kombucha is very beneficial for anyone trying to detox the body or recover from illness especially when antibiotics have been taken. Using friendly microbes to fight pathogenic microbes is good medicine and the way the ancient peoples did it. For those who want probiotics but do not consume dairy products like yogurt, this is a great alternative.

*Information taken from a flyer handed to me by Joanne Seal who produces starts for many healty cultures such as. Sourdough, kombucha, kefir pearls, yogurt, and Prill Beads for pure water.

Sinus & Nasal Spray With Xylitol

1 Fine mist sprayer bottle (can be found at health food stores or on-line)
1 oz purified water
1/8 tsp non-aluminum baking soda
1/8 tsp xylitol

Mix together and use daily to hydrate the sinuses, and relieve the effects of dry or re-circulated air.

All Natural Homemade Deoderant

8 oz Shea Butter


1 Tbsp arrowroot powder
2 tsp Baking Soda (aluminum free)

1 tsp vitamin E Oil (optional)
1/2 - 1 tsp organic essential oils and/or flavor oils

Use pure and organic ingredients for the best results.

Store in an aluminum-free food grade container.

How to use Essential Oils

When you are looking for essential oils, be sure to find those that are certified organic and spectramatigraph tested.
Here are some instructions for essential oil use:

Direct Application
- Apply neat, directly to the skin on location (the definition "neat). Dilute oils if necessary with message oil.
- Oils penetrate the skin. Rapid absorption delivers benefits throughouth the body within minutes.
-When trying new oils, always test a small area of skin before applying over the body.

Direct Inhalation
-Put several drops into the palms of your hands, rub together, or put on a tissue.
-Cup your hands over your nose and mouth, breathe deeply.

Massage
-Mix 10-12 drops (5 for children) of your favorite essential oils with one ounce of massage/carrier oil.

Wear as a purfume or cologne
-Apply pure, thereapeutic essential oils.
-Essential oils are superior alternatives to synthetic fragrances and deoderants.

Personal Care Items
-Cleanse, rejuvenate, heal with the amazing botanicals and oils from nature-pure essential oils! Just add essential oils to your shampoo, conditioner, lotions, etc.
-Create your own essential oil-infused deodorant, or skin care oil, or tooth polish.

Bath
-Add 5-10 drops essential oil to Dead Sea Salt or Sea Salt, mix. Put in a warm bath.

Diffusing
-Set a mood or cleanse the air with mists of healing and protection.

Vaporizer/Humidifier
-Lavender oil is ideal for baby's room to calm and soothe with a healing aroma.
-Essential oils such as Eucalyptus, Lemon, or Frankincense are historical favorites to use in vaporizers.

Dietary Suppliments
-High quality, nutrient dense nutritional blends are essential to your daily vitality.
-Many essential oils can be ingested simply by putting 2-4 drops in a veggie capsule (obtain them at your local helath food store), and if needed, fill remaining space in capsule with edible oil. Can be taken with meals, or in between meals.
-Check with your health care professional before consuming any essential oils directly from the bottle.

Create a Compress
-Rub several drops of oil on desired location.
-Cover the area with a hot, damp towel. Cover the moist towel with a dry towel.
-If the 'heat' of the oil ised becomes too intense, apply message oil - or any pure vegetable oil - on location to dilute intensity.

Cleaning/Disinfecting In and Around The House
-A few drops of esssential oil may be added to the dishwasher or washing machine to clean and disinfect.
-Some essential oils create an environment that is unfrindly to and kills germs and bacterial. Some favorites include Lemon, Peppermint, Tea Tree, and Thyme.

GF Low-Glycemic Mesquite Cupcakes

Ingredients: Makes 18 servings (18 each)
1 cup Coconut Palm Sugar
1/3 cup Coconut flour
2/3 cup Mesquite flour
2-1/4 tsp. Baking Powder
1/4 tsp. Real Salt
6 Large Eggs
1/4 cup Whole Milk
6 Tbsp. Unsalted Butter
1/2 tsp. Vanilla Extract

Directions:

1 Mix together dry ingredients.
2 Mix together we ingredients.
3 Add the wet to the dry ingredients and mix thoroughly.
4 Insert 12 cupcake liners into cupcake pan.
5 Fill liners 1/2-3/4 full.
6 Bake for 15-20 min.
7 Let cupcakes cool for 10 min. Put them in a Ziploc bag and place in fridge for 30 min. The flavors will be enhanced and the cupcakes will be perfectly moist and ready to eat. Enjoy!

Top with Cream Cheese Frosting Recipe:
1 Box Cream Cheese (at room temperature)
6 Tbsp unsalted butter (melted)
1 cup coconut palm sugar

- Transfer frosting to a pastry bag. Refrigerate for 15-30 minutes. Frost your cupcakes. Enjoy!


Nutrition Facts
Low-Glycemic Chocolate Cupcakes
Serving Size 1 each

Amount Per Serving
Calories 130.53 Calories from Fat 50

% Daily Value
Total Fat 5.83g 9%
Saturated Fat 3.16g 16%
Trans Fat 0.12g
Cholesterol81.02mg 27%
Sodium87.87mg 4%
Total Carbohydrate17.52g 6%
Dietary Fiber 2.37g 9%
Sugars 11.26g
Protein 2.99g 6%
Vitamin A (IU) 96.45 2%
Vitamin C 0.36mg 1%
Calcium 20.97mg 2%
Iron 0.52mg 3%

GF Low-Glycemic Coconut Cupcakes

Ingredients: Makes 18 servings (18 each)
1 cup Coconut Palm Sugar
1/3 cup Coconut flour
2/3 cup Fine Cut Coconut Flakes
2-1/4 tsp. Baking Powder
1/4 tsp. Real Salt
6 Large Eggs
1/4 cup Whole Milk
6 Tbsp. Unsalted Butter
1/2 tsp. Vanilla Extract

Directions:

1 Mix together dry ingredients.
2 Mix together we ingredients.
3 Add the wet to the dry ingredients and mix thoroughly.
4 Insert 12 cupcake liners into cupcake pan.
5 Fill liners 1/2-3/4 full.
6 Bake for 15-20 min.
7 Let cupcakes cool for 10 min. Put them in a Ziploc bag and place in fridge for 30 min. The flavors will be enhanced and the cupcakes will be perfectly moist and ready to eat. Enjoy!

Top with Cream Cheese Frosting Recipe:
1 Box Cream Cheese (at room temperature)
6 Tbsp unsalted butter (melted)
1 cup coconut palm sugar

- Transfer frosting to a pastry bag. Refrigerate for 15-30 minutes. Frost your cupcakes. Enjoy!


Nutrition Facts
Low-Glycemic Chocolate Cupcakes
Serving Size 1 each

Amount Per Serving
Calories 122.88 Calories from Fat 60

% Daily Value
Total Fat 6.6g 10%
Saturated Fat 3.88g 19%
Trans Fat 0.12g
Cholesterol81.02mg 27%
Sodium87.16mg 4%
Total Carbohydrate14.2g 5%
Dietary Fiber 1.16g 8%
Sugars 9.31g
Protein 2.63g 6%
Vitamin A (IU) 96.45 2%
Vitamin C 0mg 0%
Calcium 15.45mg 2%
Iron 0.4mg 2%

GF Low-Glycemic Chocolate Cupcakes

Ingredients: Makes 18 servings (18 each)
1 cup Coconut Palm Sugar
1/3 cup Coconut flour
2/3 cup Cocoa Powder
2-1/4 tsp. Baking Powder
1/4 tsp. Real Salt
6 Large Eggs
1/4 cup Whole Milk
6 Tbsp. Unsalted Butter
1/2 tsp. Vanilla Extract

Directions:

1 Mix together dry ingredients.
2 Mix together we ingredients.
3 Add the wet to the dry ingredients and mix thoroughly.
4 Insert 12 cupcake liners into cupcake pan.
5 Fill liners 1/2-3/4 full.
6 Bake for 15-20 min.
7 Let cupcakes cool for 10 min. Put them in a Ziploc bag and place in fridge for 30 min. The flavors will be enhanced and the cupcakes will be perfectly moist and ready to eat. Enjoy!

Top with Cream Cheese Frosting Recipe:
1 Box Cream Cheese (at room temperature)
6 Tbsp unsalted butter (melted)
1 cup coconut palm sugar

- Transfer frosting to a pastry bag. Refrigerate for 15-30 minutes. Frost your cupcakes. Enjoy!


Nutrition Facts
Low-Glycemic Chocolate Cupcakes
Serving Size 1 each

Amount Per Serving
Calories 116.31 Calories from Fat 60

% Daily Value
Total Fat 6.13g 9%
Saturated Fat 3.16g 16%
Trans Fat 0.12g
Cholesterol81.02mg 27%
Sodium79.35mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate14.56g 5%
Dietary Fiber 2.07g 8%
Sugars 8.3g
Protein3.14g 6%
Vitamin A (IU) 96.45 2%
Vitamin C 0mg 0%
Calcium 15.04mg 2%
Iron 0.57mg 3%

Sunday, May 22, 2011

Easy Pizza Sauce


1 (6 oz) Can Organic Tomato Paste
6 oz can water
1 tsp sea salt
2 tbsp organic Italian herbs

Mix together in a small pan on the stove. Heat through then add on top of pizza crust.
Let cool then add cheese.

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Bodhi Yoga

One of the healing modalities that I am looking into is Yoga and I am blessed that this studio is just down the street from me.  They offer classes to become an instructor, I am going to do this in the next spring (if finances allow).

During your Five Immersion Sessions, you will learn:

•    To teach a complete repertoire of Yoga Asana Postures

•    A variety of Vinyasa Power Flow Styles and Sequencing

•    The twelve Systems of the Body as related to the body of Yoga

•    Anatomy/Emotions of Yoga Movement

•    Structures of Sanskrit/Ayurveda

•    Teaching students yoga through body awareness

•    Comprehensive approaches to asana Hands-on-adjusting

•    Developing Specialized Classes

•    Skills for leading groups or private sessions with confidence
and authenticity.

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Ayurveda Hair Care

Soap Nuts as Replacement for Laundry Soap

Soap Nuts are a wonderful natural product, they can be used for laundry soap or for a household cleanser. I used the liquid in my Bissell Green Clean Machine and cleaned my couches, it worked wonderfully!

For Laundry:

Either add 4-5 Soap Nuts into a cotton bag and throw it into your washer with your laundry or use about 1 tbsp liquid.

Soap Nuts Liquid

5 Deseeded Soap nuts
4 Cups Water

Boil until reduced to about 1 cup water. Then strain the soap nuts and add to some sort of squeezable bottle or to a glass jar. Use about 1 tbsp. per wash load.

You can also use it to replace your liquid dish soap, as a general all purpose cleanser and as a carpet cleaner.


Thursday, April 21, 2011

Alternative Career Path

I've looked into several alternative health care programs, including a career path to become a Naturopathic Doctor, (the "White Coat" ceremony at SCNM made that career course even more inviting...). ;)

I also looked at the Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Alternative Medicine at Everglades University on pg. 9 of their catalog.

Both courses would have been terrific opportunities, however for me they would take too much time and would have cost too much money to complete and the program at Everglades would have left me wondering "What Next?"

SCNM 4 Years - Approx. $96,800

Earnings Potential $30-$100/yr

Everglades 3 + Years - Approx. $102,900

SO I found that there is something called "Occupational Therapy" with a program nearby it is a 2 Year Program and the earnings potential is about $40,000+ a year. The cost is also low, about $6,902.00 and I could pursue a "Master Herbalist" course through the school of Natural Healing, with some of the other disciplines offered through Naturopathy and the Alternative medicine course and would only cost about $5,180.00.

Therefore I could be an Occupational Therapist and a Master Herbalist for about $12,000.00 and it will take about 2 years for "Occupational Therapy" and "6 Months - 3 Years" for the Master Herbalist course (though it usually takes 1 1/2 years).

Here's all of the information that I have gathered:

Natural Healing Life Course: Everglades University

Herbology and Botany
Homeopathy

Nutrition and Aging
Detoxification and Healing
The Herbal Medicine Chest
(Reflexology)

Everglades University Cost $8575.00 (Excluding Reflexology)
Dr. Christophers $3955.00

Dietary Influences on Disease
Antioxidants
Manual Therapies: Massage, Reflexology, and Acupressure
Alternative Approaches to Arthritis, Cancer, and Heart Disease
Stress Reduction and Relaxation
Miasms and Constitutional Treatment
Naturopathy
Body Awareness and Physical Movement

Feng Shui

Traditional Chinese Medicine Principles of Accupuncture
Ayurvedic Medicine


http://www.schoolofnaturalhealing.com/Career_Opportunities.html

Master Herbalist Course
-Complete Master Herbalist On-Line -  $3000.00

Course List:
Level 100 - Family Herbalist
Level 200 - Fundamentals of Natural Healing
Level 300 - Basic Herbal Healing
Level 400 - Nutritional Healing
Level 500 - Specifics in Herbal Healing
Level 600 - Herbal Health for Women
Level 700 - Introduction to Herbal Traditions
Level 800 - Herb Identification
Level 900 - Herb Botany
Level 1000 - Herbal Horticulture
Level 1100 - Herbal Preparations
Level 1200 - Herbal Practice Part 1
Level 1300 - Herbal Practice Part 2
Level 1400 - Herbal Formulary
Level 1500 - Herbal History
Level 1600 - Herbal Therapies
Level 1700 - Anatomy
Level 1800 - Advanced Botany
Level 1900 - Herbal Chemistry
Level 2000 - Herbal Jurisprudence
Level 2100 - Herbal Mastery
Level 2200 - Pharmacognosy

Books that are purchased separately:



How to Raise a Healthy Child in Spite of Your Doctor text by Dr. Robert Mendhelsohn, MD

Vaccines: Are They Really Safe and Effective? text by Neil Z. Miller

Eat to Live by Joel Fuhrman

Back to Eden text by Jethro Kloss

Herb Flashcards

Regional Field Guide (specific to your area)

Botany for Gardeners text by Brian Capon

Growing and Using Herbs Successfully text by Betty Jacobs

Green Pharmacy text by Barbara Griggs

A Modern Herbal: Volumes 1&2 by Mrs. M. Grieve

The Human Body in Health and Disease text by Memmler-Cohen-Wood

Botany in a Day by Thomas J. Elpel

Green Pharmacy text by James Duke

-Complete Master Herbalist through Correspondence - $6190.00

Iridology (Basic) $595.00
Aromatherapy (Basic) $630.00
Homeopathy (Basic) $495.00
Reflexology (Basic) $460.00

Additional Information:
Level 100 (Family Herbalist) and Level 1700 (Anatomy) from the Master Herbalist program are pre-requisites to all of these courses except the Certified Herbal Retailer course. The cost is about $690.00 extra for both.



Sunday, April 17, 2011

Apricot Butter

Makes 2 quarts

4 cups unsulphered dried apricots
1 tablespoon sea salt
1/4 cup whey
1/4-1/2 cup raw honey

Cook apricots in filtered water until soft. Let cool slightly and transfer with a slotted spoon to food processor. Process with remaining ingredients. Taste for sweetness and add more honey if necessary. Place in quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jars. The apricot butter should be at least 1 inch below the tops of the jars. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 2 days before transferring to refrigerator. This should be eaten within 2 months. It is excellent with breakfast porridge or on pancakes.

Variation: Apple Butter - Use dried apples instead of apricots

Variation: Pear Butter - Use dried pears instead of apricots.

Ketchup

Makes 1 Quart

3 cups canned tomato paste, preferably organic
1/4 cup whey
1 tablespoon sea salt
1/2 cup maple syrup
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
3 cloves garlic, peeled and mashed
1/2 cup homemade fish sauce or commercial fish sauce

Mix ll ingredients until well blended. Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar. The top of the ketchup should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Leave at room temperature for about 2 days before transferring to refrigerator.

Pineapple Chutney

Makes 1 Quart

1 small pineapple
1 bunch cilantro, coarsely chopped
1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 cup whey
1/2 cup filtered water

Mix pineapple, cilantro and ginger and place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar. Press down lightly with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer. Mix lime juice, sea salt and whey with water and pour over pineapple, adding more water if necessary to cover the pineapple. The chutney should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for 2 days before transferring to refrigerator. This should be eaten withing 2 months.

Variation: Hot Pineapple Chutney

Add 1 small red onion, 1 jalapeno pepper and 1/2 red pepper, all finely chopped.

Salsa

Makes 1 quart

4 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and diced
2 small onions, finely chopped
3/4 cup chopped Chile pepper, hot or mild
6-8 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped (optional)
1 bunch cilantro, chopped
1 teaspoon dried oregano
juice of 2 lemons
1 tablespoon sea salt
4 tablespoons whey (if not available use an additional 1 tablespoon salt)
1/4 cup filtered water

Mix all ingredients and place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar. Press down lightly with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer, adding more water if necessary to cover the vegetables. The top of the vegetables should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 2 days before transferring to cold storage.

**Ketchup provides us with an excellent example of a condiment that was formerly fermented and therefore health promoting, but whose benefits were lost with large scale canning methods and a reliance on sugar rather than lactic acid as a preservative. The word "ketchup" derives form the Chinese Amoy dialect ke-tsiap or pickled fish-brine or sauce, the universal condiment of the antcient world.

Ginger Carrots

4 cups grated carrots, tightly packed
1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
1 tablespoon sea salt
4 tablespoons whey (if not available, use an additional 1 tablespoon salt)

These are the best introduction to lacto-fermented vegetables we know; the taste is delicious; and the sweetness of the carrots neutralizes the acidity that some people find disagreeable when they are first introduced to lacto-fermented vegetables. Ginger carrots go well with rich foods and spicy meats.

In a bowl, mix all ingredients and pound with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer to release juices. Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down firmly with a pounder or a meat hammer until juices cover the carrots. The top of the carrots should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and leave at room temperature about 3 days before transferring to cold storage.

Sauerkraut

Makes 1 Quart

1 medium cabbage, cored and shredded
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
1 tablespoon sea salt
4 tablespoons whey (if not available use an additional 1 tablespoon salt)

In a bowl, mix cabbage with caraway seeds, sea salt and whey. Pound with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer for about 10 minutes to release juices. Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down firmly with a pounder or a meat hammer until juices come to the top of the cabbage. The top of the cabbage should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 3 days before transferring to cold storage. The sauerkraut may be eaten immediately, but it improves with age.

Whey and Cream Cheese

Makes 5 cups whey and 2 cups cream cheese

2 quarts piima milk
whole-milk buttermilk
yoghurt or raw milk

We call for the use of whey in many recipes - as a starter culture for lacto-fermented vegetables and fruits, for soaking grains and as a starter for many beverages. The cream cheese, which is a by-product, is far superior to the commercial variety, which is produced by putting milk under high pressure and not by the beneficial action of lactic-aid-producing bacteria.

If you are using piima milk or whole-milk buttermilk, let stand at room temperature 1-2 days until the milk visibly separates into white curds and yellowish whey. If you are using yoghurt, no advance preparation is required. You may use homemade yoghurt or good quality commercial plain yoghurt. If you are using raw milk, place the milk in a clean glass container and allow it to stand at room temperature 1-4 days until it separates.

Line a large strainer set over a bowl with a clean dish towel. Pour in the yoghurt or separated milk, cover and let stand at room temperature for several hours (longer for yoghurt). The whey will run into the bowl and the milk solids will stay in the strainer. Tie up the towel with the milk solids inside, being careful not to squeeze. Tie this little sack to a wooden spoon placed across the top of a container so that more whey can drip out. When the bag stops dripping, the cheese is ready. Store whey in a mason jar and cream cheese in a govered glass container. Refrigerated, the cream cheese keeps for about 1 month and the whey for about 6 months.

Piima Milk

Makes 1 Quart

1 quart fresh whole milk, nonhomogenized
1 tablespoon starter culture (available on-line or at Real Foods Market in Orem, Utah if you happen to live nearby)

This is a good way to add enzymes and restore nutrients to pasteurized milk. The resultant product is not too thick and can be drunk like milk and used in infant formula. Try to find milk from a dairy that allows its cows (or goats) to pasture feed. Do not use ultrapasteurized or homogenized milk.

Place milk in a clean glass container. Add the starter, stir or shake well, cover tightly and place in a spot where the temperature is a stable 72-75 degress for 20 to 24 hours. Chill well.

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Gluten Free German Pancakes (Oven Pancakes)

These are easy and nutritious, a Sunday morning favorite!

German Pancakes

2/3 C. GF Flour (use a Chia seed flour, or add 1 tsp. Guar Gum/Xanthan Gum to flour)
3/4 tsp. salt
2 Large eggs
1 cup milk
4 Tbsp. Butter

Melt butter in a large cast iron skillet in a 350° oven. Pull skillet out of the oven when butter has melted. Mix together dry ingredients then mix in eggs and milk, pour into skillet, then place skillet back into oven for 20 minutes.

When done cut and serve with jam or honey.

Enjoy! :)

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