Thursday, April 21, 2011

Alternative Career Path

I've looked into several alternative health care programs, including a career path to become a Naturopathic Doctor, (the "White Coat" ceremony at SCNM made that career course even more inviting...). ;)

I also looked at the Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Alternative Medicine at Everglades University on pg. 9 of their catalog.

Both courses would have been terrific opportunities, however for me they would take too much time and would have cost too much money to complete and the program at Everglades would have left me wondering "What Next?"

SCNM 4 Years - Approx. $96,800

Earnings Potential $30-$100/yr

Everglades 3 + Years - Approx. $102,900

SO I found that there is something called "Occupational Therapy" with a program nearby it is a 2 Year Program and the earnings potential is about $40,000+ a year. The cost is also low, about $6,902.00 and I could pursue a "Master Herbalist" course through the school of Natural Healing, with some of the other disciplines offered through Naturopathy and the Alternative medicine course and would only cost about $5,180.00.

Therefore I could be an Occupational Therapist and a Master Herbalist for about $12,000.00 and it will take about 2 years for "Occupational Therapy" and "6 Months - 3 Years" for the Master Herbalist course (though it usually takes 1 1/2 years).

Here's all of the information that I have gathered:

Natural Healing Life Course: Everglades University

Herbology and Botany
Homeopathy

Nutrition and Aging
Detoxification and Healing
The Herbal Medicine Chest
(Reflexology)

Everglades University Cost $8575.00 (Excluding Reflexology)
Dr. Christophers $3955.00

Dietary Influences on Disease
Antioxidants
Manual Therapies: Massage, Reflexology, and Acupressure
Alternative Approaches to Arthritis, Cancer, and Heart Disease
Stress Reduction and Relaxation
Miasms and Constitutional Treatment
Naturopathy
Body Awareness and Physical Movement

Feng Shui

Traditional Chinese Medicine Principles of Accupuncture
Ayurvedic Medicine


http://www.schoolofnaturalhealing.com/Career_Opportunities.html

Master Herbalist Course
-Complete Master Herbalist On-Line -  $3000.00

Course List:
Level 100 - Family Herbalist
Level 200 - Fundamentals of Natural Healing
Level 300 - Basic Herbal Healing
Level 400 - Nutritional Healing
Level 500 - Specifics in Herbal Healing
Level 600 - Herbal Health for Women
Level 700 - Introduction to Herbal Traditions
Level 800 - Herb Identification
Level 900 - Herb Botany
Level 1000 - Herbal Horticulture
Level 1100 - Herbal Preparations
Level 1200 - Herbal Practice Part 1
Level 1300 - Herbal Practice Part 2
Level 1400 - Herbal Formulary
Level 1500 - Herbal History
Level 1600 - Herbal Therapies
Level 1700 - Anatomy
Level 1800 - Advanced Botany
Level 1900 - Herbal Chemistry
Level 2000 - Herbal Jurisprudence
Level 2100 - Herbal Mastery
Level 2200 - Pharmacognosy

Books that are purchased separately:



How to Raise a Healthy Child in Spite of Your Doctor text by Dr. Robert Mendhelsohn, MD

Vaccines: Are They Really Safe and Effective? text by Neil Z. Miller

Eat to Live by Joel Fuhrman

Back to Eden text by Jethro Kloss

Herb Flashcards

Regional Field Guide (specific to your area)

Botany for Gardeners text by Brian Capon

Growing and Using Herbs Successfully text by Betty Jacobs

Green Pharmacy text by Barbara Griggs

A Modern Herbal: Volumes 1&2 by Mrs. M. Grieve

The Human Body in Health and Disease text by Memmler-Cohen-Wood

Botany in a Day by Thomas J. Elpel

Green Pharmacy text by James Duke

-Complete Master Herbalist through Correspondence - $6190.00

Iridology (Basic) $595.00
Aromatherapy (Basic) $630.00
Homeopathy (Basic) $495.00
Reflexology (Basic) $460.00

Additional Information:
Level 100 (Family Herbalist) and Level 1700 (Anatomy) from the Master Herbalist program are pre-requisites to all of these courses except the Certified Herbal Retailer course. The cost is about $690.00 extra for both.



Sunday, April 17, 2011

Apricot Butter

Makes 2 quarts

4 cups unsulphered dried apricots
1 tablespoon sea salt
1/4 cup whey
1/4-1/2 cup raw honey

Cook apricots in filtered water until soft. Let cool slightly and transfer with a slotted spoon to food processor. Process with remaining ingredients. Taste for sweetness and add more honey if necessary. Place in quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jars. The apricot butter should be at least 1 inch below the tops of the jars. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 2 days before transferring to refrigerator. This should be eaten within 2 months. It is excellent with breakfast porridge or on pancakes.

Variation: Apple Butter - Use dried apples instead of apricots

Variation: Pear Butter - Use dried pears instead of apricots.

Ketchup

Makes 1 Quart

3 cups canned tomato paste, preferably organic
1/4 cup whey
1 tablespoon sea salt
1/2 cup maple syrup
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
3 cloves garlic, peeled and mashed
1/2 cup homemade fish sauce or commercial fish sauce

Mix ll ingredients until well blended. Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar. The top of the ketchup should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Leave at room temperature for about 2 days before transferring to refrigerator.

Pineapple Chutney

Makes 1 Quart

1 small pineapple
1 bunch cilantro, coarsely chopped
1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 cup whey
1/2 cup filtered water

Mix pineapple, cilantro and ginger and place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar. Press down lightly with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer. Mix lime juice, sea salt and whey with water and pour over pineapple, adding more water if necessary to cover the pineapple. The chutney should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for 2 days before transferring to refrigerator. This should be eaten withing 2 months.

Variation: Hot Pineapple Chutney

Add 1 small red onion, 1 jalapeno pepper and 1/2 red pepper, all finely chopped.

Salsa

Makes 1 quart

4 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and diced
2 small onions, finely chopped
3/4 cup chopped Chile pepper, hot or mild
6-8 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped (optional)
1 bunch cilantro, chopped
1 teaspoon dried oregano
juice of 2 lemons
1 tablespoon sea salt
4 tablespoons whey (if not available use an additional 1 tablespoon salt)
1/4 cup filtered water

Mix all ingredients and place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar. Press down lightly with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer, adding more water if necessary to cover the vegetables. The top of the vegetables should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 2 days before transferring to cold storage.

**Ketchup provides us with an excellent example of a condiment that was formerly fermented and therefore health promoting, but whose benefits were lost with large scale canning methods and a reliance on sugar rather than lactic acid as a preservative. The word "ketchup" derives form the Chinese Amoy dialect ke-tsiap or pickled fish-brine or sauce, the universal condiment of the antcient world.

Ginger Carrots

4 cups grated carrots, tightly packed
1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
1 tablespoon sea salt
4 tablespoons whey (if not available, use an additional 1 tablespoon salt)

These are the best introduction to lacto-fermented vegetables we know; the taste is delicious; and the sweetness of the carrots neutralizes the acidity that some people find disagreeable when they are first introduced to lacto-fermented vegetables. Ginger carrots go well with rich foods and spicy meats.

In a bowl, mix all ingredients and pound with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer to release juices. Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down firmly with a pounder or a meat hammer until juices cover the carrots. The top of the carrots should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and leave at room temperature about 3 days before transferring to cold storage.

Sauerkraut

Makes 1 Quart

1 medium cabbage, cored and shredded
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
1 tablespoon sea salt
4 tablespoons whey (if not available use an additional 1 tablespoon salt)

In a bowl, mix cabbage with caraway seeds, sea salt and whey. Pound with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer for about 10 minutes to release juices. Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down firmly with a pounder or a meat hammer until juices come to the top of the cabbage. The top of the cabbage should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 3 days before transferring to cold storage. The sauerkraut may be eaten immediately, but it improves with age.

Whey and Cream Cheese

Makes 5 cups whey and 2 cups cream cheese

2 quarts piima milk
whole-milk buttermilk
yoghurt or raw milk

We call for the use of whey in many recipes - as a starter culture for lacto-fermented vegetables and fruits, for soaking grains and as a starter for many beverages. The cream cheese, which is a by-product, is far superior to the commercial variety, which is produced by putting milk under high pressure and not by the beneficial action of lactic-aid-producing bacteria.

If you are using piima milk or whole-milk buttermilk, let stand at room temperature 1-2 days until the milk visibly separates into white curds and yellowish whey. If you are using yoghurt, no advance preparation is required. You may use homemade yoghurt or good quality commercial plain yoghurt. If you are using raw milk, place the milk in a clean glass container and allow it to stand at room temperature 1-4 days until it separates.

Line a large strainer set over a bowl with a clean dish towel. Pour in the yoghurt or separated milk, cover and let stand at room temperature for several hours (longer for yoghurt). The whey will run into the bowl and the milk solids will stay in the strainer. Tie up the towel with the milk solids inside, being careful not to squeeze. Tie this little sack to a wooden spoon placed across the top of a container so that more whey can drip out. When the bag stops dripping, the cheese is ready. Store whey in a mason jar and cream cheese in a govered glass container. Refrigerated, the cream cheese keeps for about 1 month and the whey for about 6 months.

Piima Milk

Makes 1 Quart

1 quart fresh whole milk, nonhomogenized
1 tablespoon starter culture (available on-line or at Real Foods Market in Orem, Utah if you happen to live nearby)

This is a good way to add enzymes and restore nutrients to pasteurized milk. The resultant product is not too thick and can be drunk like milk and used in infant formula. Try to find milk from a dairy that allows its cows (or goats) to pasture feed. Do not use ultrapasteurized or homogenized milk.

Place milk in a clean glass container. Add the starter, stir or shake well, cover tightly and place in a spot where the temperature is a stable 72-75 degress for 20 to 24 hours. Chill well.

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